Archive for the Science Category

What I learned today…

Posted in Books, Games, Movies, Science, Tech with tags , , , , , on November 19, 2010 by The Quintessential Geek
  • The weirdness of quantum mechanics is, in fact, not that weird…  Why does nature allow weirdness to exist in a limited form?  If chaos overshadows law and order, why doesn’t quantum mechanics blow our minds with rules we can’t possibly understand?  Oh, wait…
  • Playing Pro Keys in Rock Band 3 is not as easy as it looks.  Although I do find some of the easier songs more challenging on this new instrument, it’s not that the songs themselves are harder, but rather having to deal with an extra finger – the thumb.  When playing guitar or bass, we are used to ignoring our thumb, but you need all 10 fingers to properly master the keyboards in this game.  What would make this the quintessential game?  Release the complete Dark Side of the Moon album by Pink Floyd, playable all in one setting.  Narcotics, anyone…?
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16 Golden Retrievers teach about atoms

Posted in Science with tags , , , on February 6, 2010 by The Quintessential Geek

Interacting with a beam of light

Posted in Science with tags , on August 22, 2009 by The Quintessential Geek

[via Ishikawa Komuro Laboratory]

“A laser spot bounces on a figure being drawn on paper, trying to escape the labyrinth of lines. There is no camera nor projector; Sticky Light proposes an experience where the audience can touch and interact with a beam of pure light – and even play a pong game with bare hands.”

10 Things We Don’t Understand About Humans

Posted in Science with tags , on August 13, 2009 by The Quintessential Geek

“We belong to a remarkably quirky species. Despite our best efforts, some of our strangest foibles still defy explanation

But as science probes deeper into these eccentricities, it is becoming clear that behaviours and attributes that seem frivolous at first glance often go to the heart of what it means to be human.”

[via New Scientist]

The people behind the LHC [Colliding Particles]

Posted in Science with tags , , , on May 14, 2009 by The Quintessential Geek

Colliding ParticlesI believe that most people understand that the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) located at CERN, near Switzerland,  intends on smashing two particles traveling at high speeds, and analyzing the results of those collisions.  I also believe that most people understand the magnitude of such a project, such as the size of the collider itself (27 km of material spanning three countries, dug as deep as 175 meters underground).

So what about the people running the show ? As you can imagine, designing, planning, and successfully implementing such a project requires an enourmous amount of resources, including staff, expertise, money, and time.  It would seem that many of the key players involved in this project get overshadowed by the project’s purpose and magnitude.

Luckily, a site called Colliding Particles puts a face to the LHC.  In a series of well-documented webisodes, Colliding Particles provides a very interesting insight into the minds of the poeple behind the CERN and the LHC.

It is definitely worth seeing the first episode, at the very least.  I guarantee you will never look at the LHC without thinking of all the people supporting it at every stage.

Periodic Table of the Elements in Picture Format [PTotE]

Posted in Science with tags on December 5, 2008 by The Quintessential Geek

The Periodic Table in PicturesClick any element to see hundreds of pictures, stories and facts.”

[via Periodic Table]

Periodic Table of Awesomements [Periodic Table]

Posted in Science with tags , on August 12, 2008 by The Quintessential Geek

In the 300 B.C., years before the birth of black Jesus, Aristole postulated that all good things were made of ‘win.’ That was a pretty good guess, but he was drunk and probably also having an orgy. Modern day awesominers know there are actually 118 fundamental ‘awesoments’ that compose all good things. The Periodic table of Awesoments can be a very useful tool. It’s designed to show the relationships between awesoments, and often one can even predict how awesoments interact simply by their positions on the table.”

[via The Dapperstache]